Home > Daily Forecast > April 12, 2019 #TriCitiesWx Forecast

April 12, 2019 #TriCitiesWx Forecast

April 12, 2019

Only in the mountains did we see rain today, and some of us might not see rain tomorrow. But the big event comes up on Sunday afternoon, when severe thunderstorms are possible. Welcome to the Tri-Cities Weather Blog forecast for tonight through Tuesday!

We finished off today at 78 degrees, a fine day for most of us despite the clouds. Just to the east of the Tri-Cities in the mountains, a few storms did pop up today. We might have a little rain tomorrow, before strong to severe storms enter the forecast on Sunday. Here’s the outlook:

  • Tonight-Cloudy, a few rain showers. Low 57.
  • Saturday-Partly to mostly cloudy, a couple rain showers possible. High 77.
  • Saturday night-Cloudy with a slight chance of rain. Low 58.
  • Sunday-Increasing clouds, with showers and thunderstorms in the afternoon and evening. High 75.
  • Monday-Partly cloudy, maybe a stray shower early. High 59.
  • Tuesday-Mostly sunny. High 73.

Today didn’t produce as much rain as expected, which is always a good thing. Off-and-on rain showers and storms are possible all the way through tomorrow night.

Low pressure develops in Texas and moves east and northeast tomorrow. It’s that system that could bring severe weather in east Texas and Louisiana tomorrow through our area late Sunday. As it looks right now, gusty to damaging winds are possible, with some hail as well.

The later it is Sunday before the storms arrive means the smaller of the chances of any of that, including possible isolated tornadoes. Any severe thunderstorm can produce a tornado real quick, so be aware of that even if you’re not under a tornado warning but a severe thunderstorm warning. Sometimes the “without warning” comments come when it’s “just” a severe thunderstorm warning that is posted for a storm that produces a tornado.

All of that said, it doesn’t look terribly likely that tornadoes will be a part of the severe weather trend for us on Sunday afternoon and evening. We have far better chances of seeing storms that produce hail and damaging winds. Either way, make sure your WEA alerts are enabled on your phone…and don’t turn them off! That is our modern day weather radio (and you can still get those!), and it follows us wherever we go if a severe weather polygon is painted over our particular point on the earth. No programming is needed!

Now. Having said all of that, things will be cooler on Monday, but things will clear out. Tuesday should be mostly sunny, and we’ll be back into the low 70’s by then.

Keep an eye to the sky this weekend, especially on Sunday! If tornado warnings are issued, you can find me on-air on 96.3 FM, 97.3 FM, 91.5 FM, 100.7 and 100.3 FM near Kingsport, along with AM 870, 1090, and 1230. Streaming options are posted on the left side of the page, as is my twitter and all of that. I’ll keep an eye on things all weekend long. Stay safe!

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